7 Easy Ways To Help Your Congested Infant Right Now

Baby tips

Is your baby suffering from a congested nose? Are they unable to relax and breathe properly? It is difficult for an infant to convey what is troubling them and as they cannot do anything to provide relief for themselves, it is the job of parents to provide them with the much-needed relief. It is important to know how you can make your baby comfortable and how to handle them when they are sick.

If your baby is suffering from cold and a congested nose, then I suggest you follow these steps to relieve them from their suffering.

  • Let your baby sleep sitting up

One of the best ways to ease your baby’s congestion is by allowing them to sleep in an upright position. If possible take baby in open, you can use jogging strollers for moms. You can either adjust their mattress by raising the one end or you can let her/him sleep against your chest while you are sitting on a chair.

  • Keep the nose clean

One of the best ways to help your infant while congestion is by clearing up the mucous that dribbles from their nose so that it doesn’t dry up and blocks their nose which would make breathing even more difficult for them. Just take a clean cloth or tissue paper and wipe their nose in every few minutes.

  • Use steam

This is an amazing way to get rid of all that congestion. Take your baby in the bathroom and fill the tub with hot water and sit beside it so the steam can help in easing down all that congestion. You can clean your baby’s nose after it is cleared of all the congestion.

  • Saline drops

If your baby is suffering a lot and you want to completely get rid of the congestion then there is another thing which you can do. You can put a few drops of saline in your baby’s nostril which will help in breaking down the mucous. You can use a bulb syringe to pull out the extra mucous after that.

  • Nasal massage

You can also perform nasal massage on your baby’s nose as this is a great way to clear out the airways and get rid of all the mucous. You can perform this once or twice a day to keep your infant’s nose clear of mucous and you will notice that your infant is more at ease every time after the massage.

  • Probiotics

Another great way to ease your baby’s congestion and to prevent them from getting any respiratory infection is by introducing probiotics in their body, which are tiny microorganisms good for their body and which keeps them fit and healthy.

  • Nursery humidifier

One of the most important things to do when your infant is suffering from congestion is to make sure their room is not too dry and a nursery humidifier helps in just that. With the help of a humidifier, you can break down your baby’s mucous and clean it out which will ease out his/her pain and will make them comfortable at least for the short interval of time.

Success Assets for Children to Tap Their High Potential

Stories

student-belonging-maslow

When you think about it, you are the sculptor, shaping your child’s life. You are Picasso painting the picture of your childs future. We are the general designers of our children’s outcomes. Ultimately they will paint their own canvas. However, we need to provide the brushes, paints and possibly help them understand their subject matter. We give them skills to shape and mold their outcomes and the colors for their attitudes and responses.

I’ve found that it helps to know yourself well before attempting to help someone else, including our children. One of the keys to knowing yourself and motivating your kids is to have a well-thought-out destination. In other words, what outcome are you after? What do you want to accomplish? What do you want your kids to do? Do they have the tools and understand what is expected of them? If they have the tools and understand what is expected of them, do they have a reason for not doing what’s expected of them? Can you think of more compelling reasons and motivations for them to fulfill their expectations and responsibilities?

After the launch of my program How To Motivate Your Kids A Three Step System For Parents A friend suggested it would be a good idea to re-post the video series on Success Assets for everyone to see. Unfortunately, the comments from the original posting are not connected any longer. These 3 videos give you an idea of my personal motivation for doing this and a system I have helped other use over the past few years.

We all want the best for our children and we want them to have every opportunity to shine. The Success Assets are for parents who want their kids to tap into their highest potential.

What is School For?

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What is school for?

Schools Kill Creativity

Below are a couple of videos that really inspired me a few years ago. In them, Sir Ken Robinson argues that school kills creativity. In an industrialized society, we strive for fitting in and getting the right answer. But as he waxes eloquently, that’s not what schools should be doing.

For me, it has become very provocative to think of education reform in the sense of creative destruction and getting to the core of helping kids really achieve their potential. I believe that education reform will actually come from a grass roots effort. It will come from unlikely sources, much like the technology that fuels it.

It will come from parents, and creative employers and entrepreneurs and the kids themselves. In many cases, the kids themselves will be the entrepreneurs who force the change.

Make no mistake change is coming

And all the political crap will continue to produce nothing, except very expensive

If your interested, and I mean interested like vested in the future, then you may also get a great deal of value from Seth Godin’s new manifesto Stop Stealing Dreams (what is a school for?). In it, he sets a slightly different tone for us to listen for in the winds of change. He is a marketer that I have followed for years and his forecast on media and trends like education reform have been dead on.

If you are more interested learning about education reform in an audiovisual way you have the following videos that I highly recommend.

Smart is Not Enough

Stories

What is the number one “Success Asset?”

Perseverance!

A recent Search Institute survey of 1,800 parents, educators, youth workers, and community leaders responded to questions about young people’s noncognitive skills, most of these respondents commenting on their own how these attributes are more important than hard skills, rote learning or cognitive abilities. They were not asked to choose one skill over another but rather asked respondents to indicate how important they saw each of the abilities on a scale of 1 to 5.

Avg Interest Ratings

The research engaged participants in thinking, talking, and ultimately acting on the following five big ideas, each of which is rooted in research and demonstrated through data.

  1. Developing young people’s noncognitive skills is an essential aspect of preparing them for success in some type of college, a career, and citizenship.
  2. There are at least five critical noncognitive skills that studies show matter most to educational success.
  3. Young people’s noncognitive skills can be strengthened by adopting one of the growing numbers of programs that focus on those skills, and by more intentionally integrating the development of those skills into the ways that adults interact with young people in existing programs and organizational structures.
  4. One of the most powerful ways to strengthen noncognitive skills is to build developmental relationships with young people that grow deeper over time.
  5. There is a perseverance process that is a practical way to build developmental relationships and to strengthen the foundational noncognitive skills of motivation and persistence.

Building Noncognitive Skills through Developmental Relationships also exposes participants to Search Institute’s long-standing research on Developmental Assets and Sparks, though which the Institute’s scientists and practitioners have studied and worked to strengthen the acquisition of noncognitive skills for more than two decades.

A breakdown of the respondents

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